Sunday

OCTONAUTS!

I just discovered this. This is like so awesome! What can I say I'm easily amused.... :D

Vampire Squid


Cookie Cutter


Slime Eel


Crafty Cuttlefish


Gian Kelp Forest


Enemy Anemones


Blobfish Brothers


Snot Sea Cucumber


The Narwhale


Check Youtube for more...

Wednesday

Fishing Under Ice



*sigh* this makes me miss ice diving. We did ice hockey and underwater skiing....

Friday

'Single cells, single cells, plankton all the way'... Christmas card made from tiny sea creatures

Amplify’d from www.dailymail.co.uk
It certainly is a Christmas card with a difference.
A marine scientist has produced this incredible Christmas card made from his own pictures of plankton.

Dr Richard Kirby has created a festive scene including a decorated Christmas tree, bells, angels and even the Star of Bethlehem.

Christmas tree of life: Every festive symbol on Dr Richard Kirby's card is made from plankton. The paddle worm Tomopteris Helgolandica looks like a Christmas tree

Because the remarkable creatures come in
so many shapes, sizes and colours the academic has been able to form
them into a classic card.

Included in the card are the paddle worm helgolandica, which looks like a Christmas tree.

There are bells made from the jellyfish Aglanthe digital held together by rings of the phytoplankton Eucampia zodiacus.

Illuminated candles are the larva of the starfish Luidia ciliaris and the star on top of the tree is a juvenile Luidia ciliaris.

The angels are sea angels, Clione limacina, and the fairy lights are Protozoan acantharea.

The Star of Bethlehem is a worm larva and the sky is filled with snowflakes that are actually baby starfish.

Dr Kirby, from Plymouth University, said: 'I was looking through the photographs of plankton and some reminded me of Christmas.

Key: Because of the reaction to his special Christmas card Dr Richard Kirby is considering putting it on sale next year

Key: Because of the reaction to his special Christmas card Dr Richard Kirby is considering putting it on sale next year

'Many people have remarked how certain plankton remind them of other things, so I've collated several pictures to make a classic Christmas card.

'The importance of these micro marvels in the sea can't be underestimated.

'Their importance on a global scale is obvious when you realize that 50 per cent of the world's photosynthesis takes place in the surface of the sea, drawing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into the oceans and releasing oxygen.

'Starting with the phytoplankton, plant-like cells mostly smaller than the diameter of a human hair, and the tiny animals that eat them called the zooplankton, these creatures underpin the whole marine food chain.
'Without the plankton food web there would be no fish in the sea or seabirds in the skies above.
'The largest mammals on earth, the baleen whales, even rely upon these smallest of sea creatures for their food.
'Most people are unaware of their presence, but if you have been swimming in the sea you will have almost certainly have swallowed them.
'It is also the plankton that give the sea its distinctive smell referred to as the 'sea air' because certain phytoplankton give off aromatic chemicals when they die.
'And they are even responsible for forming clouds because the same chemicals when in the atmosphere cause water droplets to form around them.
'Your car is also fuelled by their remains and over millions of years they created some of the most enigmatic features of our coastline.
'When you turn on the oven to cook the Christmas turkey, the gas comes from plankton that sank to the seafloor over hundreds of millions of years of earth's history.

'So when you drive your car to the festive family gathering it is all thanks to the processed plankton that fuel it.'

The worldwide success of Dr Kirby's book called 'Ocean Drifters - a secret world beneath the waves' prompted him to create the image which he may put on sale next year.

Read more at www.dailymail.co.uk
 

Tuesday

Shark that smiles for the cameras: Meet the fearsome creature that eats polar bears and can live until 200

Amplify’d from www.dailymail.co.uk
A daredevil photographer went to extraordinary lengths to photograph these rarely seen sharks, which look like they have been etched from stone.
These incredible Greenland sharks can survive for more than 200 years at depths of up to 600 metres under Arctic ice.
Bigger than the notorious great white, they grow to 23-feet long and are so fearsome they have even been known to eat polar bears.
Killer with a smile: The Greenland shark might look friendly but the beast is known to attack polar bears

Killer with a smile: The Greenland shark might look friendly but the beast is known to attack polar bears

They live further north than any other shark species and can swim in waters where temperatures plummet to just one degree celsius.
Doug Perrine had a close encounter with the elusive creatures when they ventured into the warmer waters of the St Lawrence River in North America, hunting for food.
The sharks usually eat large seals but have even been known to polish off polar bears and reindeer.
But 59-year-old Mr Perrine, from Kailua Kona, Hawaii, was brave enough to swim to just a metre away from the giants to get his shots.
He said: 'These sharks were very placid and curious. They are much calmer than other sharks - they have an almost goofy, comical appearance.
'I was amazed because most sharks are very shy of divers and tend to avoid the sound of scuba bubbles, but these these were attracted to the sound. They even swam closer to investigate.
'When I moved in closer to get a better shot, they did not flee but continued on their way at a steady pace."
He added: 'The sharks were able to satisfy their curiosity about me by approaching to the limit of visibility at about six metres distance.
Close encounter: The sharks can grow up to 23-feet in length - bigger than a Great White

Close encounter: The sharks can grow up to 23-feet in length - bigger than a Great White

'Although they were swimming in quite a lazy fashion, they are much more streamlined than me. I had to swim quite hard to close the distance and then keep up to continue taking pictures.
'The sharks are known to prey on large seals but I never felt threatened.'
Greenland sharks have been hunted by residents in Iceland and Greenland for centuries.
Their skin is used to make boots while their teeth are turned into cutting tools.
The flesh is part of the national dish of Iceland - called the hakarl.
Caught on camera: Greenland sharks prefer colder waters and can dive to depths of 600 metres

Caught on camera: Greenland sharks prefer colder waters and can dive to depths of 600 metres

Read more at www.dailymail.co.uk
 

Monday

Picture of penguins is a prize-winner

Amplify’d from news.mongabay.com
King Penguins coming ashore at Salisbury Plain on South Georgia Island.
King Penguins coming ashore at Salisbury Plain on South Georgia Island. Photo by Carl Safina, with travel to South Georgia facilitated by Lindblad Expeditions




Carl Safina's picture of King Penguins coming ashore at Salisbury Plain on South Georgia Island was the first winner of mongabay.com's series of photo contests hosted on Facebook.



Fans of the mongabay.com page on Facebook participated in the vote, selecting among more than 30 photos submitted by users.



Runners up in the contest were Lucille Le Corre with a shot of a Blue Crowned Pigeon at Weltvogelpark in Germany and Patricia Paladines with her picture of an Upland goose (Chloephaga picta leucoptera) and goslings in the Falkland Islands.



Safina will take home a copy of RAINFORESTS, a book recently published by mongabay.com's Rhett A. Butler.



Safina — an accomplished author, musician, and poet who runs the Blue Ocean Institute — said he was pleased with winning the contest.



“I’m tickled that my photo won Mongabay’s first photo contest. I stood in the surf in the same spot for over two hours as penguins continued coming and going, trying to make that shot work. And in the end it was worth every chilly minute," said Safina. “Penguins and other animals are living in a changing world, and the Blue Ocean Institute explains what a changing ocean means to wildlife and to people, working to instill both urgency and a sense of hope.”
Read more at news.mongabay.com